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Sotheby's Noble Jewels auction on May 15th includes "Beau Sancy" diamond, a stone of supreme historical importance.

 

 

 

This pear double rose cut of 34.98 carat has been passed down through the Royal Families of France, England, Prussia and the House of Orange and this carbon creation has been the  witness of 400 years of European history. It's history is rich with romance, misfortune, love, politics and bravado. This one diamond exerts such a powerful allure and beauty that it has been set in royal crowns, busted state budgets and sealed marriages.

 

The Beau Sancy comes with a pedigree inextricably linked to the fortunes of the royal houses of Europe. The stone was acquired by Nicolas de Harlay, Lord of Sancy (1546-1629), in Constantinople in the mid to late 1500's, the Beau Sancy is most likely to have originated from the mines in south- central India near the city of Golconda, the source of history's best-known diamonds, including the Hope, the Koh-i-Noor and the Regent. In 1604, the Beau Sancy was bought for 75 000 livres (25 000 écus) by Henri IV and gifted to his wife, Marie de Medici. The Queen of France had long desired the stone, particularly after learning that de Sancy had sold a larger stone, today known as the "Sancy", to King James I of England1. Testament to the importance her Majesty placed on the diamond, the Beau Sancy was mounted atop the crown she wore at her coronation in 1610, as shown in a magnificent portrait by Frans II Pourbus, the Younger, now in the Louvre

 

Following Henri IV's assassination by Ravaillac, the Queen was exiled in disgrace and escaped to the Netherlands. Heavily in debt, her possessions were sold and the Beau Sancy was acquired by Prince Frederick Hendrick of Orange-Nassau (1584-1647) for 80 000 florins - the most important expenditure in the state's budget in 1641. In the same year, in an attempt to reinforce the alliances of the United Provinces of Holland with the great European powers, the diamond was used to seal the arrangement of the wedding of Frederick Hendrick's son, Willem, later Willem II of Orange Nassau (1631-1660), to Mary Stuart, daughter of Charles I of England and Henriette-Marie of France, and grand-daughter of Marie de Medici.

After the death of her husband, Mary Stuart embarked for England with her jewels in order to support her brother Charles II in his fight for the throne. In 1662, the Beau Sancy was pawned to settle her debts and it was only in 1677, on the occasion of the wedding of Willem III of Orange-Nassau (1650-1702) to Mary II Stuart, daughter of the King of England James II, that the diamond reentered the Treasure of the House of Orange-Nassau. In 1689, the couple ascended the throne of England and thus the Beau Sancy now joined the collection of the Queen of England. However, as the monarchs were childless at their death, the diamond went back to the House of Orange-Nassau.

In 1702, following the settlement of a dispute between the heirs to the House of Orange, Friedrich I who had just been crowned the first King of Prussia, gave up the jewels of his legacy to obtain the Beau Sancy. The symbolic value and the prestige of the celebrated gem were such that the King made it the principal ornament of the new royal crown of Prussia and associated it with the first order of Prussia, the Order of the Black Eagle.

The largest gemstone within the House of Prussia's collection, the Beau Sancy passed down to each successive generation until today. Worn by the women of the family on important royal occasions, the diamond adorned the costume of each successive bride on the day of her princely wedding, much like it had in the past. When the last German Emperor and King of Prussia fled to exile in Holland, in November 1918, the crown jewels remained at the Kaiser's palace in Berlin. At the end of World War II, the collection was transferred to a bricked-up crypt for safe keeping in Bückeburg, where it was later found by British troops and returned to the estate of the House of Prussia.

 

After the war, the diamond was subsequently passed down to the eldest son of the Kaiser, Kronprinz Wilhelm (1882-1951) and his son, Prince Louis Ferdinand (1907-1994). After the death of Prince Louis Ferdinand, the diamond was inherited as part of the estate by his grandson, Georg Friedrich (1976-), Prince of Prussia and current head of the Royal House of Prussia.

 

 

 

The Magnificent Jewels section will also features Boucheron,  Bulgari, Van Cleef & Arpels, Chaumet, Cartier, Tiffany & Co jewels and stones.

 

A propos de l'auteur

Julie Cailleux Mialet, Designer & Gemmologist, has revisited the Gemstone Universe with her High Standard Collection of Necklace, Rings and Earrings by cleverly mixing Pearls, Rough Rocks, Fine or Precious Gems. By her expertise, professionalism, dynamism but also by her Stonecutters and Brokers contacts through the world; Julie will be able to advise you in regards to Gemstone. Gemmology is her passion which allow her to introduce, to her customers, gems that are not well know on the French Market. Ladies that loves gems and jewels loves her creations. Her Necklaces, Rings or Earrings are suited to all type of fabrics, seasons and moods. Her creations are realised in her Paris’ Studio and respect the norm of ‘La Joaillerie Française’ With large variety of prices, quality product, designer style, personalised advise and a sales point at the Paris’ Village Suisse; Les Pierres de Julie is a must go places to find a jewel or unique piece to offer.